Sharing the experience of user experience design.

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Hi,

Just wanted to share inspiring website named: http://www.uxzeal.com/  … Good place to find quality websites,unique logos and User Interface Shots.

Regards,

Adam

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Source: did-you-kno

Vinay Kuruvila's Tumblr: How we increased landing page conversion from 5% to 55%

quicksprints:

Our product, Sidelines (http://sidelinesapp.com) lets sports fans share and discuss opinions, photos, articles and videos about their favorite teams. At launch, we started out with fairly low landing page conversion (roughly 5%). We found some great, zero-cost ways of driving users to our…

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Personal Infographics! Do you have your own? 
There are today lots of tools to make a better personal presentation about yourself on web. RE.VU is one of them, I used this tool to make mine infographic and it was a good experience. It is liked to Linkedin and imported a lot of data from there. Have custom graphics and different themes.

Personal Infographics! Do you have your own? 

There are today lots of tools to make a better personal presentation about yourself on web. RE.VU is one of them, I used this tool to make mine infographic and it was a good experience. It is liked to Linkedin and imported a lot of data from there. Have custom graphics and different themes.

Source: re.vu

You only see what you are aware for. 

It shows that user experience shouldn’t be based on what is inside the screen, but constructed by all previous situations that happens before and through the use. If you want to show something new, prepare the user to see what you will show, building the awareness.

Source: theteamw.com

The experience of projecting interactions to validate experiences of use. Beautiful…
But sometimes you have to decide between finding and market opportunity to get money and finding people needs to solve their problem (you can get both, but both is not enough). Observation is the way to get enlighten, be one of them is the way to get envolved, forget about the difference between you and them makes you feel an incomparable satisfaction of solving “Our problem”. This is the process to constantly feel useful and stimulated. 
Today it’s really possible to make thing happen by collective effort. The argument, the logical, the purpose became the best way to get things done. Do you need money? don’t talk with an investor, talk with people that needs that thing that you are working on.
Normally when you work on interface design you became inside an Office Bubble Cycle. Get out of your personal space NOW and figure out the ecosystem that you live! The world needs you, they will support you, they can be with you to change the situation. All you need to do is convince them about the relevance of your idea. Try to make this argumentation expansible (Site, Video, Infographic) or you will be tired of explaining to each one what you are doing.
Conclusion? None at all… Just thinking. The process sometimes is better then the result.

The experience of projecting interactions to validate experiences of use. Beautiful…

But sometimes you have to decide between finding and market opportunity to get money and finding people needs to solve their problem (you can get both, but both is not enough). Observation is the way to get enlighten, be one of them is the way to get envolved, forget about the difference between you and them makes you feel an incomparable satisfaction of solving “Our problem”. This is the process to constantly feel useful and stimulated. 

Today it’s really possible to make thing happen by collective effort. The argument, the logical, the purpose became the best way to get things done. Do you need money? don’t talk with an investor, talk with people that needs that thing that you are working on.

Normally when you work on interface design you became inside an Office Bubble Cycle. Get out of your personal space NOW and figure out the ecosystem that you live! The world needs you, they will support you, they can be with you to change the situation. All you need to do is convince them about the relevance of your idea. Try to make this argumentation expansible (Site, Video, Infographic) or you will be tired of explaining to each one what you are doing.

Conclusion? None at all… Just thinking. The process sometimes is better then the result.

Source: donaldclarkplanb.blogspot.com.br

GRID by BINARY shows a nice way to produce multimedia content to project, share and remember.

Very nice content from http://hibilly.com/ Tumblr

Source: hibilly.com

Very innovative camera that takes pictures easy and with all focus possibilities. 

Very innovative camera that takes pictures easy and with all focus possibilities. 

Source: technologyreview.com

Why rounded corners?
Professor Nänni is saying that rounded rectangles are literally easier on the eye.Put another way, compared to square-edged rectangles, rounded rectangles are more computationally efficient for the human brain. To me, this is a revelation. An idea that at the very least demands more investigation.

Why rounded corners?

Professor Nänni is saying that rounded rectangles are literally easier on the eye.Put another way, compared to square-edged rectangles, rounded rectangles are more computationally efficient for the human brain. To me, this is a revelation. An idea that at the very least demands more investigation.

Source: uiandus.com

Darren Northcott Talks about the difference between user experience and information architecture.

Darren Northcott Talks about the difference between user experience and information architecture.

Source: uxbooth.com

UI PARADE shows the importance of the finishing step of an interface. When the interface show obviously what that component does, it is also easier to interact. When the beauty makes you feel visually comfortable, secure and calm, the user will probably stay in touch with you app.

UI PARADE shows the importance of the finishing step of an interface. When the interface show obviously what that component does, it is also easier to interact. When the beauty makes you feel visually comfortable, secure and calm, the user will probably stay in touch with you app.

Source: uiparade.com

Quirky has rapidly accelerated the traditional product development cycle, but perhaps the better example of rapid iteration is how I have launched three businesses in five years. Five years may not sound like very rapid anything, but trust me, it was.In the spirit of the 99%, I want to share some of the tenets I live by – the ones that have enabled us to accelerate product development and make so many ideas materialize. 1. It is very much about ideas.It’s been said that it’s not about ideas, it’s about making ideas happen. Who could disagree? Me. It’s very much about ideas. Lots and lots of good ideas. The trick is killing good ideas quickly and swiftly in an effort to focus on great ones. This requires being a ruthless prioritizer and relentless critic. You need to be able to sift quickly through a long list of ideas both good and bad, slicing and dicing until you end up with a great, effective, and elegant solution. 2. Find great critics.Part of the idea-killing process is surrounding yourself with critics who aren’t afraid to give it to you straight. Quick, educated opinions, even if they’re harsh, are key to picking up and moving forward to your next iteration. 3. Don’t worry about the new, focus on the next.Fail and fail fast. At Quirky, every product we develop, whether it’s a runaway success or a huge flop, teaches us valuable lessons that we can apply to future iterations of that product or other products.  Whether it’s a failure, success, or something in-between, there’s always something to learn from each iteration. We’re never “done,” which allows us to stay on our toes and figure out what’s the next step for that initiative, instead of worrying about what was just delivered. 4. Set unrealistic deadlines.This is where people start to think I’m nuts. Put ambitious goals on the table and publicize the heck out of them. This may force you out of your comfort zone, but that’s the best place for a creative person to be. Knowing that people are expecting great things will motivate you to actually make those things happen. And hey, if you fail, at least you’ll learn a good lesson for next time. 5. Distract yourself from your unrealistic deadlines.It’s natural to get too caught up in an ambitious or unrealistic project. Make sure you take regular breaks to pursue other interests – reading, sports, cooking, or anything else that uses your brain in a different way. Doing other things allows your big project to percolate in the back of your mind in a way that can be surprisingly productive. The inspiration you’ll need to meet your unrealistic goal – that “a-ha!” moment – usually comes when you least expect it, especially when you’re trying to do something that’s never been done before. 6. Know what options D, E, and F look like.Even if you follow all of the tips listed above, you’re probably not going to get it right each and every time. Most people will tell you to have a Plan B and C; I’d take it a step further and say come up with a Plan D, E, and F as well. You want to be flexible and always look as far down the pipeline as possible. If A, B, and C fail, use the best elements of those plans or experiences to create newer, better plans. There’s no shame in making an F if it’s better than A, B, C, D, or E. 7. Take a deep breath.Living a rapidly iterative life can burn you out pretty quickly. It’s important to give yourself time between iterations to pause and regroup. Use this break to evaluate the previous project(s) and gather your thoughts so you can take on the next one. —Ben Kaufman is the 23-year-old founder of Quirky, a social product development company that launches a brand new consumer product each week.

Quirky has rapidly accelerated the traditional product development cycle, but perhaps the better example of rapid iteration is how I have launched three businesses in five years. Five years may not sound like very rapid anything, but trust me, it was.

In the spirit of the 99%, I want to share some of the tenets I live by – the ones that have enabled us to accelerate product development and make so many ideas materialize.
 
1. It is very much about ideas.
It’s been said that it’s not about ideas, it’s about making ideas happen. Who could disagree? Me. It’s very much about ideas. Lots and lots of good ideas. The trick is killing good ideas quickly and swiftly in an effort to focus on great ones. This requires being a ruthless prioritizer and relentless critic. You need to be able to sift quickly through a long list of ideas both good and bad, slicing and dicing until you end up with a great, effective, and elegant solution.
 
2. Find great critics.
Part of the idea-killing process is surrounding yourself with critics who aren’t afraid to give it to you straight. Quick, educated opinions, even if they’re harsh, are key to picking up and moving forward to your next iteration.
 
3. Don’t worry about the new, focus on the next.

Fail and fail fast. At Quirky, every product we develop, whether it’s a runaway success or a huge flop, teaches us valuable lessons that we can apply to future iterations of that product or other products.  Whether it’s a failure, success, or something in-between, there’s always something to learn from each iteration. We’re never “done,” which allows us to stay on our toes and figure out what’s the next step for that initiative, instead of worrying about what was just delivered.
 
4. Set unrealistic deadlines.
This is where people start to think I’m nuts. Put ambitious goals on the table and publicize the heck out of them. This may force you out of your comfort zone, but that’s the best place for a creative person to be. Knowing that people are expecting great things will motivate you to actually make those things happen. And hey, if you fail, at least you’ll learn a good lesson for next time.
 
5. Distract yourself from your unrealistic deadlines.
It’s natural to get too caught up in an ambitious or unrealistic project. Make sure you take regular breaks to pursue other interests – reading, sports, cooking, or anything else that uses your brain in a different way. Doing other things allows your big project to percolate in the back of your mind in a way that can be surprisingly productive. The inspiration you’ll need to meet your unrealistic goal – that “a-ha!” moment – usually comes when you least expect it, especially when you’re trying to do something that’s never been done before.
 
6. Know what options D, E, and F look like.
Even if you follow all of the tips listed above, you’re probably not going to get it right each and every time. Most people will tell you to have a Plan B and C; I’d take it a step further and say come up with a Plan D, E, and F as well. You want to be flexible and always look as far down the pipeline as possible. If A, B, and C fail, use the best elements of those plans or experiences to create newer, better plans. There’s no shame in making an F if it’s better than A, B, C, D, or E.
 
7. Take a deep breath.
Living a rapidly iterative life can burn you out pretty quickly. It’s important to give yourself time between iterations to pause and regroup. Use this break to evaluate the previous project(s) and gather your thoughts so you can take on the next one.
 

Ben Kaufman is the 23-year-old founder of Quirky, a social product development company that launches a brand new consumer product each week.

Source: 99u.com

Sliced: 13 Tenets of User Experience

A list of 13 beliefs on the value of user experience strategy, design, and designers:

  1. User experience is the net sum of every interaction a person has with a company, be it marketing collateral, a customer service call, or the product or service itself. It is affected by the company’s vision and the beliefs it holds and practices, as well as the service or product’s purpose and the value it holds in that person’s life.
  2. User experience is strategic. It begins with an idea intended to improve the lives of its users, and continues through every moment of the customer lifecycle, from attention to abandonment and beyond. It is driven by a vision that guides and justifies every design decision.
  3. Every detail of a company and its services and products says something about it. User experience strategy and design ensures that these messages are put forth with intention and purpose. Design extends into each and every detail, and each and every detail can indeed be designed.
  4. User experience is a process of discovery, vision definition, strategy, planning, execution, measurement, and iteration. It requires flexibility, and a willingness to be wrong until you are right.
  5. Great products and services require bravery. Design puts a shape to your courage.
  6. A great service or product is rarely the mere logical result of research. Most often, it is the result of a brave belief that what you are doing will change the world, and a determination to do it well.
  7. The solvers of the world’s problems will be those who apply their skill, talent, knowledge, and experience to design and redesign the world around us. Whether they call themselves designers or not, the creators of the future will be those who design.
  8. The goal of a designer is to listen, observe, understand, sympathize, empathize, synthesize, and glean insights that enable him or her to “make the invisible visible” (Hillman Curtis) — to pull treasure out of nothing, to pull value out of vapor.
  9. The job of a designer, just like a writer, is to twist and stretch and shape a conceptualized piece of work over and over again until it becomes the masterpiece the world needs it to be.
  10. Designers do not act on opinion, but insight. They do not mandate, but educate. While the best decision can often only be based on the best guess, designers inform their instincts every single day so that these guesses may be right.
  11. Designers enable companies to change the world, define the future, create value, and make a ton of money, and there is endless evidence of this fact.
  12. An experience can not be designed, but it can be influenced. A designer’s job is to be the influencer.
  13. Designers do not manage. They lead.
Source: dutchmoto

THE BOOK THAT WON’T WAIT YOU READ.

http://www.mediabistro.com/galleycat/book-disappears-while-you-read_b54031

Source: mediabistro.com

Is there something wrong?

crankyangela:

Mobile to the Future
Notes on Luke Wroblewski’s “Mobile To The Future” presentation at An Event Apart Austin

Is there something wrong?

crankyangela:

Mobile to the Future

Notes on Luke Wroblewski’s “Mobile To The Future” presentation at An Event Apart Austin

Source: zeldman.com